Norway’s oil fund faces pressure from Nordic indigenous people over Dakota

first_imgThe fact that the Norwegian state was investing in the “black snake” – protesters’ nickname for the pipeline – was hard to swallow, she said.A Sami Parliament spokesman added that the assembly would continue to lobby Norwegian bank DNB, which is partly owned by the state, and the GPFG over the issue.The Norwegian parliament is expected to hold finance committee hearings this month or in April about guidelines for the exclusion of companies from the GPFG’s investment universe.Norges Bank Investment Management (NBIM), which manages the GPFG, did not comment on the level of investment the fund had in the US pipeline project.Decisions on exclusions of companies are based on recommendations from the Council on Ethics, which is appointed by the Ministry of Finance.“The Sami Parliament suggests taking some wording of indigenous peoples’ rights into account in the guidelines,” the Sami spokesman said, adding that parliament representatives would take part in the hearings.    Vibeke Larsen, president, Sami ParliamentLarsen said the Sami parliament had written to KLP over its continued investment in the pipeline companies, and she had also emailed the pension fund to bring to its attention a relevant statement of 3 March from the UN special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples.KLP then announced at a meeting with parliament representatives in Oslo on 13 March that it had decided to divest after all, despite having defended the ethical basis for the investments at the beginning of the month.The fund cited the UN rapporteur’s statement along with a relevant past decision by the GPFG’s Council on Ethics as supporting documentation for its divestment move.Larsen said she was pleased with KLP’s decision.“But we would not like them to get into the same position later on in another project, so we are offering them some help regarding indigenous peoples’ rights,” she said. “They invest in 3,000 companies and sometimes they will come up against problems.”Norwegian financial group Storebrand announced at the beginning on this month that it had sold all its shares in companies involved in the Dakota pipeline, and Nordic group Nordea excluded the companies in mid-February.Meanwhile, Swedish state pension fund AP7 is considering divesting from its exposure to companies behind the project, a spokesman for the fund confirmed.“There seems to be a solid basis for this,” he said.More information would be available in June when the fund next revises its exclusion list, he said. The Sami Parliament of Norway – which represents the Nordic region’s indigenous population – has vowed to keep pressure on the country’s sovereign wealth fund to shed its investments in companies behind the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline in the US.Lobbying by the indigenous people who inhabit territory in the north of Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia in support of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe in the US appears to have been instrumental in persuading municipal pension fund KLP to divest its involvement in the pipeline project earlier this week.Norway’s NOK7.7trn (€841bn) Government Pension Fund Global (GPFG) has yet to make such a move.Vibeke Larsen, president of the Sami Parliament, told IPE: “Other Nordic pension funds have sold this project, but the government pension fund is still in it.”last_img read more

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People moves: Fidelity hires from Amundi for successor to Rossi

first_imgMuldoon worked in US government for more than 10 years, serving both the Barack Obama and George W Bush administrations. Her roles included deputy assistant to president Obama and counsellor to the US Treasury secretary. In a memo to staff, BlackRock said sustainable investment in Europe was one of its “biggest opportunities”. “Growth in sustainable investing is predicated on our ability to engage with clients to understand the outcomes they are seeking and to leverage our platform to deliver scalable solutions,” the memo said.KLM – Paul Loven has been appointed independent chairman of the KLM Pension Fund, effective from 1 February. Loven previously served as chief financial and risk officer at PGGM from 2009 to 2015. Prior to that, he was a member of the executive board of Van Lanschot Bank. In addition to his position at the KLM Pension Fund, Loven is a commissioner at a care organisation and he works as a consultant and coach on governance issues. His predecessor as chairman was Eltjo Kok, who took office in 2011 and retired in July 2017.Cindu International – Rita van Ewijk is the new chair of the Dutch pension fund of former chemicals company Cindu International as it prepares to join a general pension fund (APF). She was previously deputy director at ASR Verzekeringen, with responsibility for pension administration outsourcing and the establishment of the insurer’s APF. Before joining ASR, Van Ewijk was chair of the board of the Hoogovens pension fund and has also worked for APG. She succeeds Jacco Heemskerk, who left in October to lead Willis Towers Watson’s investment consulting team in the Netherlands.Macquarie Group –  The Australian-headquartered financial services group has made two hires to its transition management team, following the group’s appointment to the National LGPS Framework. Paul McGee joins Macquarie as a senior vice president, and Ben Mooney joins as a vice president. Both will join the group’s commodities and global markets group to assist institutional investors in moving money between mandates.McGee is a former head of State Street Global Markets’ transition management team, but left in 2016. Since then he has had spells in the transition management operations of private bank Coutts and asset manager M&G. Mooney joins directly from State Street Global Markets, and has previously worked at Wellington Management, Royal Bank of Canada and HSBC.Bouwinvest – The real estate investment arm of pension fund BpfBouw has restructured and expanded the acquisition team of Bouwinvest Residential Funds. The changes are designed to help the fund achieve its goal of investing €600m by 2020. Casper Hulsman becomes acquisition manager for residential and is responsible for purchases in The Hague, Leiden and western North Holland. Christian Schouten has been appointed as coordinator, also responsible for the acquisitions in Amsterdam, Utrecht and east Netherlands. Hymans Robertson – Risk-transfer expert Michael Abramson has joined consultancy firm Hymans Robertson as a partner and risk transfer specialist. He joins from Prudential where he was director of wholesale transactions. In 15 years working in consulting and insurance, including roles at Legal & General and Mercer, Abramson has worked on some of the largest derisking deals ever completed in the UK, his new employer said in a statement.Jupiter Asset Management – The UK-based listed asset manager has hired Talib Sheikh as head of strategy for multi-asset. He will join in June from JP Morgan Asset Management (JPMAM) to lead Jupiter’s expansion of its multi-asset offerings. Sheikh worked at JPMAM for nearly 20 years, building out the company’s multi-asset solutions team from inception in 2004.HSBC Global Asset Management – Fredrik Cygnaeus has joined HSBC GAM as managing director of its branch in Sweden. He will be responsible for building the group’s business across the Nordic region. He joins from Invesco where he led the company’s external wholesale business in the Nordics. He has also worked at Fidelity.Barnett Waddingham – The UK consultant has hired Mark Stocker its corporate consulting team. A qualified actuary, Stocker specialises in “pension scheme disputes, contentious matters and acting in an expert witness capacity”, the company said. He provided expert evidence to court in Ontario in relation to the collapse of Nortel Networks. He was previously a director and chief actuary at Conduent HR Services, and has also worked in senior roles at Mercer and LCP.OppenheimerFunds – Charles Oldmeadow has joined the US-based asset manager as business development director, focusing on intermediary clients and institutions in the UK. He joins from Jupiter Asset Management where he was responsible for discretionary wealth managers. Fidelity International, BlackRock, KLM, Cindu International, Macquarie, Bouwinvest, Hymans Robertson, Jupiter Asset Management, HSBC Global Asset Management, Barnett Waddingham, OppenheimerFundsFidelity International – The asset management giant has poached Romain Boscher from Amundi Asset Management to be its new global CIO for equities, effective 30 April 2018. He succeeds Dominic Rossi, who has moved to a public policy role within Fidelity. Boscher joined Amundi in 2011, and was previously deputy CEO and CIO at Groupama.Bart Grenier, global head of asset management at Fidelity International, described Boscher as “an investor with an exceptional track record”. He added: “Our equities franchise is a significant part of our business and we are passionate about delivering great active returns for our clients. I am delighted to welcome someone of such calibre into the company and I know that our equities franchise will continue to thrive and develop for the benefit of our clients under his leadership.”BlackRock – The world’s largest asset manager has appointed Meaghan Muldoon to lead its sustainable investing operations in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. She was previously the group’s managing director of corporate strategy, based in New York, but has now relocated to London. She reports to Brian Deese, a former adviser to the US government who joined BlackRock last year.last_img read more

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Carillion: TPR could pursue former directors for recoveries

first_imgThe UK Pensions Regulator (TPR) has indicated it could pursue former Carillion senior staff as part of its investigation into the collapsed company’s pension schemes.Nicola Parish, TPR’s executive director of frontline regulation, told a parliamentary inquiry this week that the regulator was “looking at all avenues” for using its powers to recover money for Carillion schemes.The company went into liquidation on 15 January with just £29m (€33m) in reserves. Its 14 pension schemes had a combined deficit of more than £800m.The regulator opened an “anti-avoidance” investigation on 18 January. Nicola Parish gives evidence to the Carillion joint inquiryParish said TPR was “looking into the activities of all of the parties concerned to see what all of the possibilities are for the use of our powers”.However, she emphasised that as there were four different agencies all investigating Carillion – TPR, the Financial Conduct Authority, the Insolvency Service, and the Financial Reporting Council – “we are really keen that we don’t trip over each other”.TPR last year used its anti-avoidance powers to secure £363m from Sir Philip Green to help fund pension schemes attached to high street chain BHS, which he had sold in 2015.Dominic Chappell, who bought the now-bankrupt company through his firm Retail Acquisitions, was due to be sentenced today over failing to assist the regulator with its investigation.Carillion director ‘thought pensions were waste of money’The joint committee also published details of a meeting between the Carillion trustees and TPR from 2013. The trustees called for regulatory assistance after it failed to reach an agreement with the company over funding contributions.According to the committee’s release: “The regulator queried why the company was reluctant to accept what, on the face of it, appeared to the regulator to look like a reasonable [funding] proposal from the trustees.“RE’s [Robin Ellison, trustee chairman] understanding was that the finance director, Richard Adam, considered funding pension schemes to be a ‘waste of money’, particularly in respect of deferred members who did not actively contribute towards the business.”The joint committee, chaired by Field and fellow Labour MP Rachel Reeves, has published a swathe of documents going back nearly 10 years detailing discussions between TPR, the trustees and the company as well as the developing funding situation of the schemes. Frank Field, Labour MP and co-chair of the joint committee investigating the circumstances of Carillion’s demise, pressed Parish over the regulator’s actions against individual directors who, he said, “all made a lot of money out of this company”.last_img read more

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Consultants’ ESG advice ‘paramount’ given new regulations

first_imgThe organisations identified services that trustees should be able to expect every consultant to offer as a minimum, such as manager selection, appointment and monitoring processes on ESG issues.Best practice, according to the report, would include providing more advanced ESG advice, such as climate change scenario analysis and stress testing, where applicable to the consultants’ business model. Janice Turner, co-chair of AMNTMinimum requirements must also extend to the consultants’ internal governance arrangements, according to the AMNT and UKSIF. Best practice in this area, they indicated, would include “integration of ESG objectives into staff performance evaluation… [and] mechanisms for assessing the effectiveness of their ESG activities, and transparency about that effectiveness to key stakeholders”.Trustees should conduct a skills analysis of their investment consultants and ensure they understood consultants’ processes for including ESG in manager selection, appointment and monitoring, the report said.The latter was “of particular importance” given the recent regulatory changes stemming from the Department of Work and Pensions.“The new regulations, in effect, oblige any consultant of integrity to ensure their clients have the information and guidance”Janice Turner, co-chair of AMNTConsultants, meanwhile, should plan to be able to provide the minimum services as soon as possible “or risk losing clients that respond to the increasing demands laid upon them”, said the AMNT and UKSIF.They, too, should focus in particular on fund manager selection, appointment and monitoring processes.Janice Turner, co-chair of AMNT, said: “The investment consultants are key to enabling trustees to fulfil the new requirements: in our view, the new regulations, in effect, oblige any consultant of integrity to ensure their clients have the information and guidance in this regard that they should be entitled to expect from their professional advisor.“By working with UKSIF to create a coalition of consultants that will recognise this, our intention is ensure that our members are given the professional support that they need.”The report can be found here. Investment consultants are showing willingness to help trustees deal with regulatory changes relating to consideration of environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) factors, but more work is needed, according to the Association of Member Nominated Trustees (AMNT) and UKSIF. The organisations today published a report on 16 investment consultants’ public commitment to bring regulatory guidance on ESG matters to the attention of pension scheme trustees. The report is billed as a guide for trustees to hold consultants to account on ESG matters.  Since the consultants expressed their commitment, new rules have been adopted that require trustees, from October 2019, to state their policy on taking account of ESG considerations including climate change.“The provision of quality advice on [ESG] issues by the UK investment consultant industry to its pension fund clients has become paramount in the light of recent regulatory developments,” said AMNT and UKSIF, a membership group promoting sustainable investment, in their report.last_img read more

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LGPS pool backs renewables fund, begins EM equity search

first_img“This fund is a good fit with both our clients’ return expectations from infrastructure, but also their combined commitment to be responsible, long-term owners of sustainable investments.”Neither Brunel nor NTR disclosed the value of pool’s investment. The £30bn (€33.4bn) Brunel Pension Partnership has invested in a renewable energy fund alongside Legal & General (L&G) and the European Investment Bank (EIB).The investors are among those committing a total of €229m to Irish infrastructure manager NTR’s second Renewable Energy Income Fund, according to a press release from NTR.NTR has secured €145m for the fund’s first close, with the ultimate aim of raising €500m to invest in new-build wind turbines and solar energy farms. It has already made three acquisitions for the portfolio: two French wind farms and a portfolio of “solar projects” in the UK.Richard Fanshawe, head of private markets at Brunel, said: “Brunel is pleased to be backing NTR’s experienced and capable team to deliver a portfolio of predominantly greenfield renewable energy generation assets in western Europe. Source: NTRWind turbines owned by NTR’s investment fundsBrunel was formally launched last year to pool and manage assets on behalf of 10 Local Government Pension Scheme (LGPS) funds based in south and south-west England.L&G Capital, the direct investment arm of UK insurance giant L&G, has committed to match 20% of all funds raised for the new vehicle, up to a maximum of €100m.John Bromley, head of clean energy strategy at L&G Capital, said his company aimed to invest long-term capital in “businesses, innovative technology and infrastructure that will help deliver clean and affordable energy to the UK”, adding that a “step-change” in renewable investment was required. The EIB has pledged €84m to the fund, with the commitment guaranteed by the European Fund for Strategic Investments.NTR itself has also invested in the fund, as has the endowment fund for Trinity College Dublin.Brunel advances search for emerging market managersSeparately, Brunel has launched a formal tender for emerging market equity managers to run a portion of a mandate expected to be worth roughly £1.1bn.The LGPS pool first announced plans for the mandate in November, inviting managers to submit research material to help inform Brunel’s thinking.More than 100 managers registered for information updates prior to the launch of the formal tender, Brunel said today. They have until 25 January to submit expressions of interest.center_img Mark Mansley, chief investment officer, BrunelBrunel’s chief investment officer Mark Mansley said: “We are keen to receive tenders from fund managers which are innovative in their thinking, and with clear, consistent approaches that can be applied widely across the emerging markets specialism.“We are looking for managers able to meet our 2-3% performance target. Managers will be afforded considerable flexibility, including the ability to invest outside the benchmark, in frontier markets, smaller companies, and developed market companies with significant emerging market exposure, but they should be able to cover the core emerging markets to start with.”Brunel said it would likely appoint “three to four” managers to run £200-500m each.The emerging markets project follows Brunel’s launch of a £1bn smart beta fund in November, and a £1.6bn UK equities fund in December.It has also made commitments to long-lease property funds run by M&G and Aberdeen Standard Investments.last_img read more

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​PKA ousts Chinese carmaker in auto sector climate scrutiny

first_imgPKA announced it has excluded a Chinese carmaker from its investment universe and put five more auto firms on its watch list, as the Danish pension fund manager sets tighter climate requirements for the world’s largest automotive brands.PKA said it blacklisted Brilliance China Automotive, whose stock is listed on the Hong Kong stock exchange as well as several German bourses, due to its “lack of focus on climate” while also revealing it had placed brands Suzuki, Hyundai, Fiat Chrysler, Subaru and Mahindra & Mahindra under observation.Dewi Dylander, head of responsible investment at PKA, said: “It is crucial for us that car manufacturers consider how they will contribute to the green transition.“In the long term, a lack of climate strategy will pose an investment risk to our members,” she added. A spokesman for PKA told IPE the firm had DKK1.4m (€190,178) invested in the Chinese auto maker in December 2019, before divesting the holding in early 2020 due to this transport sector climate initiative.PKA, which manages four labour-market pension funds mainly in the health and social care sectors, said that in its new work on the auto industry’s climate impact, it had initially focused on 15 of the world’s largest carmakers in which it was invested.Following the scrutiny exercise, it said nine of these remained on its list of investments.The Danish pensions manager said its new focus on the automotive industry was an addition to its work on responsible investment and active ownership of oil, gas and coal companies.Car firms were now subject to the same requirements as those fossil fuel companies, PKA said – to be willing to discuss a greener direction and to contribute to meeting the goals of the Paris Agreement.The DKK330bn (€44.3bn) manager said the car firms identified for exclusion or observation had been deemed either to have an insufficient environmental strategy – or had simply been unwilling to engage with PKA about their climate ambitions.“We ask, among other things, for the companies’ handling of climate-related risks, whether they are actively dealing with the Paris Agreement and if not, if they are prepared to discuss our concerns and how their business can become more sustainable in the future,” said Dylander.PKA said the Paris-based International Energy Agency estimated that there needed to be 600 million electric and hybrid vehicles on the roads by 2040 in order to get closer to the goals of the Paris Agreement, with vehicle emissions currently accounting for almost 75% of all C02 produced by the transport sector globally.Looking for IPE’s latest magazine? Read the digital edition here.last_img read more

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Classic charm restored at former pink palace

first_imgBut many of its original features have been retainedUpstairs, the previous owners had already put in a new ensuite and had renovated the kitchen, so the couple focused on opening up the floor plan.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus17 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market17 hours ago And there is plenty of open plan living spacesMrs Davies said one of her fondest memories of the home would be the “renovation journey”.“My main goal was to bring an old Queenslander back to life for the next hundred years,” she said.“And I think we have done that.“It is a lovely piece of architecture and I will really miss the sense of history it has.”The home sits on an elevated north-east facing 1158sq m block and boasts high ceilings, wide hallways, a formal living room with fireplace, a master suite with walk-in-robe/dressing room, ensuite and study, a spacious kitchen with designer appliances, three additional bedrooms, secure intercom entry and landscaped gardens.The formal living room with fireplace has been described as “elegant”, and one of the three bathrooms comes with its own powder room.Mrs Davies said her favourite room in the house was the master suite.“We are selling because the boys are older and we just don’t need such a big back yard,” Mrs Davies said.The house, which comes with the original house name plate, was built in 1900, according to CoreLogic. Mrs Davies said she believed Shalimar was named after a boat that came out to Australia.The house is being marketed by Clare Hartley of Havig & Jackson and could be yours for $2.795 million. The kitchen is modernThey installed an internal staircase, added a large family bathroom, and transformed one upstairs bedroom into a sitting room.A large deck was also added, with their architect replicating the original detailing used on the front veranda. 16 Roseby Ave, ClayfieldWhen Natasha and Bruce Davies bought Shalimar in 2010, it was pink.“That is the overwhelming memory I have,” Mrs Davies said. “It was pink. It was a typical old Queenslander, open underneath.”The sugar farming family, who split their time between Brisbane and the Burdekin, bought 16 Roseby Avenue at Clayfield to be closer to Eagle Junction State School.They spent one year renovating the home, with their boys living in one room and the couple in another during the build.center_img The house makes the most of the natural light and breezes The house has been given a new lease on lifeWith the help of Bettina Clarke of Ascot Living and Michael Dougherty of Dougherty Design, they built underneath the house, adding two bedrooms, a large rumpus, a laundry and storage area, all of which flows out on to a covered backyard patio.last_img read more

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Iconic mansion designed by famous architect sells after 3 yrs

first_imgThe late architect, Robin Gibson, at the Queensland Art Gallery, which he designed. Picture: Glenn Barnes.Ideally suited for a family with teenagers, the home has a “his and hers” type design upstairs.Mr Sourris designed the house in two halves, with the centrepiece being the lounge room upstairs.The house also has state-of-the-art interiors, fabulously manicured gardens, and an integrated Miele gas kitchen, with wonderful views from each of the four bedrooms, too. The view from the house at 7 Mullens St, Hamilton. Photo supplied.Records show it was last advertised for offers over $3.5 million and the site was previously sold for $500,000 in 1993.The four-bedroom, four-bathroom home on 1260 sqm has been kept in immaculate condition and allows breathtaking views looking over the Brisbane River and CBD. This house at 34 Mullens St, Hamilton, sold for $5.975m in 2017. This house at 7 Mullens St, Hamilton, has sold. Photo supplied.A MANSION designed by one of Australia’s most renowned architects has sold for $3.325 million after nearly three years on the market.The property at 7 Mullens St, Hamilton, was designed by the late Robin Gibson, who is acclaimed as the man who turned Brisbane’s eyes towards the river with his public buildings.The house was formerly owned by businessman/philanthropist, James Sourris, who had long been an admirer and friend of Mr Gibson.center_img More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours agoInside the house at 7 Mullens St, Hamilton.Mr Sourris’s brief for the design of the home was for it be minimalistic, contemporary and to have enough space for a party and a library.Mr Gibson, now deceased, is well known for the development of projects including the Queensland Cultural Centre, Queensland Performing Arts Centre and Queensland Art Gallery. This house at 7 Mullens St, Hamilton, has sold.Mr Sourris also owns a luxury, riverfront apartment in New Farm’s Moray Street, which he bought for $5.7 million in 2016.Mullens Street is one of Hamilton’s most exclusive streets.The award-winning home, Cremorne, at 34 Mullens Street, sold at auction for $5.975 million in late 2017.last_img read more

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Downsizers tipped to shape the future of the Gold Coast’s property market

first_imgThe Gold Coast property market is tipped to look very different in two decades.HALF of the new homes to be built on the Gold Coast over the next decade will need to be designed for cashed up Baby Boomers, new research suggests.The latest report by property analyst Michael Matusik shows roughly 146,000 people will descend on the city by 2030, with about 40 per cent of those expected to be aged 55 and over.Mr Matusik said this meant half of the anticipated 5650 new dwellings required each year should be built to meet demand of an older population.“This doesn’t mean we need to build more retirement villages because most empty nesters and retirees here on the Gold Coast are actually looking to upgrade their lifestyle when they downsize,” he said.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58“Contrary to popular belief, most downsizers don’t want small apartments, they want a property that is comparable in size to a small home and is well designed to suit their needs.Mr Matusik shared his latest research about trends that would shape the market over the next few decades in a presentation last night.He said while the Coast remained resilient in the latest downturn, it was up to developers to deliver the right type of housing to meet emerging demand.Colliers International Gold Coast director David Higgins said buyers at the top end of the market were looking for a ‘point of difference’.“While a beachside location and views that can’t be built out are certainly a drawcard, buyers are also looking for intangible amenities which indirectly improve lifestyle,” he said.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa11 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago“For example, the new Mahala project in Mermaid Beach has a rooftop solar energy farm, a secure room for online deliveries, a dog wash area and surfboard rack.MORE NEWS: Australia’s happiest property owners revealedMORE NEWS: Christmas comes early for mansion’s buyers and sellersWhat Mahala at Mermaid Beach is expected to look like.“These non-standard amenities help a project stand out from the crowd in what is an increasingly competitive apartment market.”Knight Frank director and Queensland head of project marketing Chris Litfin backed the research but believed they would be looking for smaller apartments.“It’s about how the space is used,” he said.“If it’s smaller and it doesn’t work they won’t buy it, but if it’s smaller and cleverly designed they will buy it.”last_img read more

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Queensland leads key property investor top 100 list

first_imgRental yield is one of the main considerations for many investors looking for cashflow when buying positively geared property.Seventeen of the suburbs on the list were in New South Wales, 15 in South Australia, 15 in Victoria, eight in Tasmania, and one apiece in Western Australia, Northern Territory and Australia Capital Territory. #65 George Town, TAS#66 Glenorchy, TAS#67 Crestwood, NSW#68 Lavington, NSW #69 Thabeban, QLD #80 Labrador, QLD 58 locations where prices are hotting up The list was split between suburbs with high rental yields for houses (63) and unit (37).The town of Blackwater in Queensland emerged with the best rental performance in the country, with a yield of 11.7 per cent for houses and a median value of$122,165.The top five was dominated by Queensland suburbs with Woree and Manunda taking out third and fourth spots, while in second place was Broken Hill in New South Wales, and fifth was Katanning in Western Australia.The top 100 list was made up or suburbs where houses or units had an estimated gross rental yield of 5 per cent or more a year. Seventeen of the suburbs on the list were in New South Wales. Picture: AAP Image/Sam Mooy.The analysis found that the top 100 best performing suburbs had houses with median values ranging from as low as $89,483 to as high as $521,597, while unit values spanned $133,205 to $395,577.CoreLogic research analyst Cameron Kusher said to make the cut, the suburb had to have delivered “solid rental yields, consistent rental growth and vacancy rates of less than 3 per cent”.Strong unit performance made up 37 spots on the top 100 list with houses at 63. #38 White Rock, QLD #78 Araluen, NT #79 Southport, QLD #47 Grafton, NSW #48 Avenell Heights, QLD Ranking By Rental Yield: #43 Manilla, NSW #44 Oakey, QLD Epic home with motocross track back on market #70 Kepnock, QLD #85 Edmonton, QLD #86 Aitkenvale, QLD #81 Mowbray, TAS #82 Bentley Park, QLD #1 Blackwater, QLD #25 Smithfield, SA #26 Cairns North, QLD #24 West End, QLD #27 Quirindi, NSW #28 Heatley, QLD Queensland suburbs made up 42 of the top 100 best places in the country for rental performance.Queensland has taken out top honours making up almost half the top 100 suburbs where property investors can make money, latest data revealed.The latest CoreLogic rental yield figures, released Tuesday, saw Queensland suburbs make up 42 of the top 100 best places in the country for rental performance, and one spot in the Sunshine State was also leading the nation. #74 Elizabeth Vale, SA#75 Morphett Vale, SA#76 Hamilton, VIC #77 Slade Point, QLD #10 Port Augusta, SA#11 Elizabeth North, SA #12 Holloways Beach, QLD #29 Morwell, VIC#30 Davoren Park, SA#31 Elizabeth Park, SA #32 Maryborough, QLD FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOK #37 Cranbrook, QLD Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58center_img #84 Kirwan, QLD #87 Churchill, VIC#88 Wodonga, VIC#89 Queanbeyan East, NSW#90 Forest Hill, NSW#91 Sale, VIC#92 Mudgeeraba, QLD #4 Manunda, QLD #19 Portland, VIC#20 Corowa, NSW#21 Parramatta Park, QLD #39 Carlton, VIC#40 Mooroopna, VIC#41 Salisbury, SA #42 Manoora, QLD #33 Narrabri, NSW#34 New Norfolk, TAS#35 Port Pirie South, SA #36 Svensson Heights, QLD #71 Beaconsfield, QLD #52 Smithfield Plains, SA#53 Horsham, VIC #54 Kingaroy, QLD #98 Andrews Farm, SA#99 Gungahlin, ACT#100 Queanbeyan, NSW (Source: CoreLogic Rental Performance Report) #55 Moe, VIC#56 Cootamundra, NSW#57 Munno Para, SA#58 Whyalla Jenkins, SA#59 Armidale, NSWMore from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus11 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market11 hours ago #60 Clifton Beach, QLD #2 Broken Hill, NSW #3 Woree, QLD #61 Newnham, TAS#62 Inverell, NSW#63 Westdale, NSW #64 Sarina, QLD #22 Stawell, VIC #23 Springwood, QLD #93 West Wodonga, VIC#94 Brendale, QLD #95 Currumbin Waters, QLD #13 Port Augusta West, SA#14 Westcourt, QLD#15 Bridgewater, TAS#16 Ararat, VIC #17 Park Avenue, QLD #72 Shepparton, VIC #73 Gatton, QLD #83 Upper Coomera, QLD MORE: First time home loans surge to 7-year high #49 West Kempsey, NSW#50 Claremont, TAS #51 Reedy Creek, QLD #9 Moranbah, QLD #45 Mildura, VIC #46 Roma, QLD #18 Mooroobool, QLD #96 Newnham, TAS #97 Helensvale, QLD #5 Katanning, WA#6 Cobar, NSW#7 Bordertown, SA #8 Bungalow, QLDlast_img read more

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