Mallard’s Team of the Week — Nelson Road Kings Executive

first_imgThe 2016 Edition of the Nelson Road Kings Queen City Cruise was another amazing success story for the Heritage City. Mother Nature once again provided great weather for the huge crowds that filled Baker Street in Nelson to view some amazing rides, from classic muscle cars to brand new imports and the occasional motorcycle.Mallard’s Source for sports would like to salute the Road Kings organizing committee for their countless hours of hard work and dedication in producing the largest event of the year in Nelson with Team of the Week honours.The committee includes Ron Cutler, Jack Chambers, Paul Bowolin, Woody Wudkevich, Bill Smith, Brian Haigh, Joe Mann, Marcello Piro, Cathy Corner, Dave Sabo, Frank Anderson and John Madelung.last_img

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“Evolution’s Misleading Language” Rebuked

first_img(Visited 43 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 It’s not just creationists who are fed up with evolutionists’ propensity to personify evolution, contrary to their own beliefs.In a letter to Science on Nov. 9, Alfred Nigel Burdett rebuked “Evolution’s Misleading Language.”  He didn’t have farther to look than Science Magazine itself for an example:In the News of the Week story “All that glitters” (14 September, p. 1277), Beverley Glover of the University of Cambridge describes the iridescent fruit of the African perennial herb Pollia condensata by saying, “The fruit’s dazzling display may have evolved to capitalize on birds’ attraction to sparkly objects, or to trick them into eating something that looks like a blueberry without going to the trouble of actually making juicy flesh.” At a time when remarkably few people seem to understand the basic mechanism of evolution, it seems inappropriate for Science to publish such comments without clarifying them to ensure that no one is misled.This type of deceptive language, which “combines teleology with anthropomorphism,” is inappropriate because Darwinism does not allow for final causes or purposes in nature; an organism cannot “evolve to” do something.  Yet instances in evolutionary articles and papers are rampant, Burdett indicated.  Both the Science news story and the PNAS article it referenced were guilty, he said, “indicative of how widely and unfortunately such inaccurate and misleading language is now used in the scientific literature.”Just thought you’d like to know that it’s not just CEH that hammers on this personification fallacy.  Darwinian theory, with its aimless, purposeless, blind processes, was supposed to dispense with all teleology and anthropomorphism, but we report frequent violations in these pages.  The staunch evolutionist George Williams used to chafe on that, too (5/31/2004).  Burdett’s reference to the “remarkably few people [who] seem to understand the basic mechanism of evolution” includes a non-trivial number of readers and contributors to Science, including its Editors, otherwise this besetting sin would undoubtedly be chastised more often.last_img read more

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Planets Defy Bottom-Up Assembly

first_imgAs much as they want to imagine planets forming from dust, secular astronomers run into insurmountable difficulties.Look at what’s implied in this headline by Rohini Giles on The Conversation: “‘Teenage’ Jupiter may hold the secret of how planets form.” What’s implied? Planet formation is a secret. It is not understood. Here we are, 219 years since Laplace proposed his famous nebular hypothesis, and astronomers still do not understand how planets are constructed from their assumed building blocks, gas and dust. The problem was exacerbated when astronomers were able to detect the first exoplanets (planets around other stars). Giles begins,In the past 20 years, thousands of planets have been discovered orbiting other stars. Far from resembling families of planets like Earth and its companions, most of these discoveries have made our solar system look like the odd one out.But now astronomers have announced a new exoplanet that looks surprisingly familiar. The exoplanet, 51 Eridani b, looks a lot like Jupiter – or at least the way we think Jupiter looked when it was much younger. Studying this juvenile version of our familiar neighbour will help us to unlock Jupiter’s past and find out more about the circumstances of its birth.The rule here proves the exception, the rule being the exceptionalism of Earth. Exoplanetary systems don’t fit the predictions astronomers made when they only had a sample size of one. Giles’ hope that this particular exoplanet will reveal the secret of how planets form rests on tenuous theory:We know that planets are formed in the circular cloud of dust and gas that surrounds a newborn star, but the precise way in which this happens isn’t well understood. There are two main theories for the formation of gas giant planets: core-accretion, where material gradually clumps together into bigger and bigger pieces, and disc-instability, where there is rapid fragmentation into planet-size chunks as the circular cloud cools.Astronomers have been debating those two models for years, but still don’t have an answer. Disk instability theory arose largely because of desperation with the problems from core-accretion theory. It was criticized as heretical at the time, but its main proponent, Alan Boss, couldn’t think of an alternative. Giles’ optimism that 51 Eridani b will solve the debate seems premature at best.Real accretion theory is messy. That is evident from a new paper on Icarus that tries to model it on a computer. Part of the difficulty is the N-body problem—trying to monitor the interactions of many moving parts in software, each with moving gravitational wells. Another problem is dealing with the fact that particles tend to collide and fragment, not stick together. “The present code includes an option of hit-and-run bouncing but not fragmentation, which remains for future work,” they say. But that can make all the difference. If fragmentation prevails, no planets will result.Consequently, adding more ingredients is not an answer. That’s why a press release from the Royal Astronomical Society is misleading when it says, “Bricks to build an Earth found in every planetary system.” You can’t assemble bricks without mortar. You can put all the building blocks you want around other stars, but it does not follow that they will self-organize into planets when the overwhelming tendency is fragmentation, not accretion.Computer models can also be misleading. Models, being simplifications of reality, can omit key ingredients or processes. Science Daily reported on work at the University of Chicago that tries to mimic the “early-stage planetary formation process.” The astronomers know that “Single head-on collisions typically do not dissipate enough energy to lead to sticking.” To encourage sticking (accretion), they modeled charged particles, and succeeded in getting granules of an unstated size (presumably very small). They’re omitting the obvious problem that until a granule grows up to the size of a kilometer or more in diameter, it lacks the gravitation to grow further. And since repulsion is just as likely as attraction, the more a granule grows, the more its “building blocks” will be likely to repel each other and prevent further accretion.More wishful thinking is apparent to the skeptical reader of another hopeful Science Daily piece, “Millimeter-sized stones formed our planet.” The idea here is that the small meteoritic pebbles known as chondrules “are believed to be the original building blocks of the solar system”—believed, that is, by materialists who invent these models. Whether “belief” itself is material is an interesting question. To make asteroids and planets form from chondrules, the team has to cheat by slowing them down in dust clouds as they migrate inward. This trick requires them to believe the planets formed and cleared out the dust before everything got swept into the sun in a “rapid process”.Astrobiologists, intuitively, are intrigued by water. Their hydrobioscopy habit leads them to think “life!” whenever water is inferred to exist on a planet or moon, even if the water is miles deep under the crust. Science Magazine sprang a leak in that pond with a new constraint on habitability, reported by the Royal Astronomical Society. In “Why water worlds won’t host life,” Nola Taylor Redd explains that more is not better: “Water covering the surface interacts with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in ways that can turn chilly planets frigid and make warm ones even hotter.” Watch hopes evaporate:Although the results are based on calculations of Earth-sized worlds surrounding sunlike stars, the researchers say the process would be similar for larger worlds and stars. They also say that a similar cycle would take place with other greenhouse gases, such as methane. With such a narrow range for habitability, ocean planets may not make as much of a splash as we thought when it comes to welcoming life.This effectively narrows the habitable zone. “Earth-sized water worlds are habitable only in a very limited range of temperatures—from about 0°C to 127°C,” according to the calculations. Add another constraint to the habitable zone.Secular planetary scientists deny Earth exceptionalism, and Darwinians deny human exceptionalism. It’s not surprising that many of them are political liberals who deny American exceptionalism. We should retort by saying that their opinions are not exceptional, either.Evolutionists are enamored with that phrase “building blocks.” Particles were the building blocks of stars, stars the building blocks of galaxies, dust the building blocks of planets, and chemicals the building blocks of life. Where is the builder? How do they know their building blocks are not debris of collisions? This is an example of the power of suggestion in the words used. (Visited 79 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Managing spring cover crops for feed

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Cover crops are planted for a variety of reasons — erosion control, to improve soil structure and health, to provide supplemental forage, as part of a nutrient management plan for manure application or for a combination of these reasons. Depending upon the species of cover crop planted, the crop will not be killed over the winter, but growth will resume in the spring and the grower must make some decisions regarding how to manage that crop in the spring. The management options depend upon the purpose of the cover crop. Here are some management options to consider when the goal is to utilize the crop as supplemental feed. Cover crop management as a supplemental forage with mechanical harvestThe primary management consideration is harvest timing and harvest method. Cereal rye, triticale and winter wheat are primarily used if supplemental forage is the objective. Of these three, cereal rye quality declines the most rapidly as the plant enters the reproductive growth stage and it advances most rapidly from vegetative to reproductive growth compared to the other two forages. So the window of opportunity to make a high quality forage is narrower with cereal rye.Generally the goal is to harvest these crops at boot to very early head stage of maturity. Because we do not get very many good drying days in our spring weather, the best harvest method is to harvest as a silage or as a wrapped forage rather than trying to get a dried forage product. Cover crop management in a grazing systemThe key to getting good utilization of these cover crops in a grazing system is to have enough animals to graze across the field before the crops get too mature and quality declines too much. So, the same comments about cereal rye apply here, the grazing window can be narrow.The second principle that should be followed is to use strip grazing across the field giving no more than one or two days worth of grazing at a time before moving the fence to give access to another portion.Finally be aware that grass tetany is a risk when grazing spring growth winter wheat or cereal rye so take precautions to prevent it by feeding a high Mg mineral mix.last_img read more

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Baleage: An option in better haymaking

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Throughout the Midwest, spring rains can make putting up dry hay very difficult. Last year, many producers struggled to get hay up without it getting rained on. This brings me to discuss baleage as an option for hay making.It is easy to see the reasons why you should consider baleage. Making hay at higher moisture allows you to bale closer to cutting and shorten the window of dry weather needed to get hay up. It also leads to less leaf loss, less nutrient leaching, and that makes for better quality hay. Wrapping bales also leads to less storage loss.Waiting on dry weather can also impact forage quality and productions. As forage continues to grow and mature the quality will decline. When producing dry hay, often times traffic is still an issue on fields as much as five days after cutting. This can drastically decrease yields for the next cutting. Baleage allows for a quick on and off of the field.Timing is crucial in making baleage. I recommend cutting the forage in the afternoon if possible as the sugars will be the highest in the plant during the afternoon. Baling should occur with a target of 50% moisture in the bale. The targeted range should be no more than 40% to 60% moisture. When bale moisture gets on either side of that range, fermentation patterns will be poor.Proper wrapping is very important. If the wrap is too thin, torn, or not quality plastic, your baleage will be sub-par. Baleage is only as good as the integrity of the plastic you use. Using net wrap will provide a smooth surface to wrap with less opportunity for air pockets or the plastic to be poked through.Storage of the baleage needs to be in an area that can be monitored for rodents and raccoons. Anything that tears plastic or compromises the anaerobic environment will result in ruined baleage. Storing bales close to where they will be fed is wise. Moving bales after wrapping can be difficult. Spearing the bales or poking holes in the plastic will negatively impact the baleage. You may need to look into bale grabbers or methods of grabbing and moving bales without compromising the plastic.A few tips:• Monitor bale size — large bales can weigh too much and be difficult to handle.• For balers with knives, think about removing half of the knives to improve bale integrity and limit bales that “blow apart” once opening.• Use inoculants, especially following a frost or in drier weather.• Avoid dirt and manure contamination. Listeria and Clostriduim can be an issue and cause serious risk.• Wrap will cost about $3 to $5 per bale. Don’t short the layers of wrap needed to get a good seal.• When doing a feed inventory or selling hay, remember half of the bale is water. Dry hay is only 15% moisture.last_img read more

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Playoff-bound Cubs lose to Reds in finale

first_imgUP NEXTKyle Hendricks or Jon Lester is likely to get the ball for Chicago in Game 1 of the playoffs. The Cubs dropped four of seven games against the Nationals this season. Trump attends World Series baseball game in Washington DC PLAY LIST 01:04Trump attends World Series baseball game in Washington DC00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Chicago, a runaway winner in the NL Central last season with a 103-58 record, has some decisions to make about its rotation against the Nationals, but appears to be in good shape heading into the playoffs. The Cubs closed the season with 15 wins in 19 games.Mike Montgomery pitched three scoreless innings for Chicago before John Lackey (12-12) allowed Adam Duvall’s run-scoring double in the fourth in his first relief appearance since the 2013 World Series with Boston. The right-hander could work out of the bullpen in this year’s playoffs.“I mean he gave up a run, whatever it was, but I thought he had a really good slider coming out of the pen and his velocity was normal,” manager Joe Maddon said. “So I thought he looked actually pretty good.”Scooter Gennett added an RBI single in the sixth for Cincinnati. Joey Votto doubled twice and led the majors by reaching base 321 times this year, breaking his own team record set in 2015.“I think as a complete package, this was the best year of my career,” said Votto, who won the NL MVP award in 2010.NO STEALINGCincinnati center fielder Billy Hamilton went 0 for 4 with a walk and lost out to Miami’s Dee Gordon in the race for most steals in the majors. Hamilton had 59 coming into the day, one shy of Gordon’s total.The Reds tried to get Hamilton another steal in the ninth, but Jesse Winker was thrown out at third on the front half of a double-steal attempt, ending the inning.TAKE A BOWThe Cubs paid tribute to retiring Reds right-hander Bronson Arroyo with a scoreboard message before the start of the fourth inning. The 40-year-old Arroyo waved to the cheering crowd when he was shown on the videoboard. MOST READ Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City The Chicago Cubs acknowledge their fans after the last regular season baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds, Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, in Chicago. The Reds defeated the Cubs 3-1. (AP Photo/David Banks)CHICAGO — The cheering slowly increased as the crowd of 40,971 recognized the significance of the Chicago Cubs flag on the videoboard at Wrigley Field. The banner on top of the pole for the NL Central standings rippled in the breeze as the cheering turned into an appreciative roar.The regular season is over. Next up for Chicago is the Washington Nationals.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president View commentscenter_img Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  McGuire (1-1) pitched five sparkling innings for his first major league win in his second big league start. The right-hander also picked up his first RBI when he drove in Phillip Ervin with a grounder in the fifth.“It’s been a really long journey,” he said. “I pitched well, they played unbelievable defense behind me and Tucker (Barnhart) did a great job behind the plate.”Raisel Iglesias allowed Albert Almora Jr.’s one-out homer in the ninth before finishing for his 28th save in 30 chances.Cincinnati finished last in the NL Central for the third straight season. It also went 68-94 last year.“A ton of really good things here, and that’s what gets us excited moving forward,” manager Bryan Price said. “Now we have to get our pitching in a position where we move from the bottom to more towards the top.”ADVERTISEMENT BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Anthony Rizzo and Kris Bryant each had a light day of work as the Cubs prepared for the playoffs by playing much of their roster during a 3-1 loss to Deck McGuire and the Cincinnati Reds on Sunday.Most of Chicago’s starting lineup was gone by the fifth inning. Rizzo flied out leading off the first, and then was replaced in the field by Taylor Davis. Bryant and shortstop Addison Russell were pulled after the NL Central champions batted in the fourth.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutChicago (92-70) is trying to become the first team to repeat as World Series champions since the New York Yankees won three in a row from 1998-2000. It will open the NL Division Series at the Nationals on Friday.“They’re a deep team. So are we, so it’ll be a fun series,” Rizzo said. 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Aside from familiarity, Garcia lauds Nambatac, Sollano for their work ethic

first_imgRey Nambatac and Jom Sollano. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netFamiliarity is key.And for coach Caloy Garcia, having players who aren’t strangers to his system is huge as Rain or Shine plots its way back to contender status this coming season.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf PLAY LIST 01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC With the new batch of Rain or Shine rookies coming in, Garcia likes what he sees from his group going forward.“It’s going to be a good competition for us every practice and every game. The ones we got, I’m sure, will complement the team,” he said. That’s why he didn’t shy away from drafting his former Letran studs Rey Nambatac and Jom Sollano in the first two rounds of the 2017 PBA Rookie Draft on Sunday.“They played for me before in the NCAA and they’re familiar with me. It just so happened that they fell in our laps,” Garcia, who coached at Letran for two seasons, said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutMore than his attachment with his former Knights, Garcia noted that what made him decide to pluck the two, alongside third round pick Michael Juico of San Sebastian, is their grit, something that he is in the look out for in a player.“Basically, they’re hard workers. Rey and Jom won a championship together so they have the experience. It’s all about them working hard and that’s one of the things I look for from the players, the ones who want to work hard, play hard, and give their 100 percent every practice and every game,” he said. Read Next Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 LATEST STORIEScenter_img View comments QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA MOST READ Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion PBA Board to decide Narvasa’s fate in annual planninglast_img read more

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Pink diamond sells for more than 50M setting world record

first_imgGENEVA — Christie’s has sold the “Pink Legacy” diamond at auction for more than $50 million including fees, saying it’s a new world record price per carat for a pink diamond.Christie’s said that renowned jeweler Harry Winston was the buyer. The auction house had expected to fetch $30 million to $50 million for the nearly 19-carat, rectangular-cut stone, the largest fancy vivid pink diamond that it has ever put under the hammer.It was the standout offering Tuesday at Christie’s fall jewelry auction in Geneva. The standing-room only ballroom broke into applause after the auctioneer struck down a hammer price of $44.5 million. That excludes the standard “buyer’s premium” and other fees.The stone once belonged to the Oppenheimer diamond family, and Christie’s says it’s among the most chemically pure gems.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Columbus Clippers honor Howard Hopalong Cassady with bobblehead

On a sunny Sunday afternoon, high atop the president’s suite along the first base side of Huntington Park, 78-year-old Howard “Hopalong” Cassady watched as almost 2,000 bobbleheads bearing his likeness circulated throughout the ballpark. Wearing a black and white, Hawaiian-style, button-up shirt, appropriate for the 85-degree game-time temperature, the former Ohio State Heisman-Trophy winner was at the ballpark because he was being honored by the Columbus Clippers as part of the organization’s “Columbus Icons Bobblehead Series.” The special nine-game series is something the Clippers are doing to help celebrate Columbus’ bicentennial, and Sunday’s “Howard ‘Hopalong’ Cassady Bobblehead Day” was third game in which fans had an opportunity to purchase a bobblehead of a “Columbus Icon.” “We used to do bobblehead nights for Major Leaguers who came through Columbus,” said Clippers media director Joe Santry. “Fans really liked it and we thought it would be good to do for the bicentennial.” All nine bobbleheads in the series represent a specific genre of Columbus’ history, Santry said, and all of the honorees are from Columbus. At the select games throughout the season, fans can purchase the bobblehead of the “Columbus Icon” being honored for $10 at the game or can buy a special $15 box-seat ticket that includes a voucher for the bobblehead. Tickets for box seats normally sell for $12. One Clippers fan that likes the bobblehead idea is Columbus resident Dave Muir, who bought a Cassady bobblehead at the Sunday’s game. “I think it’s great to honor the city’s own with bobbleheads,” he said. “The idea of ‘Columbus Icons’ to celebrate the city’s history is a really neat idea and I’ll try to collect as many as I can.” Santry said the Clippers chose Cassady as a “Columbus Icon” to represent the professional athletes the city has produced. Cassady, who declined to comment, played in the NFL from 1956 to 1963 with the Detroit Lions, Philadelphia Eagles and Cleveland Browns. He was the first Heisman-Trophy winner born in Columbus, winning the award in 1955, his senior season with the Buckeyes. He was a two-time consensus All-American in football, helping OSU to the 1954 National Championship. He played baseball for the Buckeyes as well. Following graduation, the Columbus-native received professional offers from the NFL and MLB. Choosing to stick with football, Detroit selected Cassady third overall in the 1956 NFL Draft, and won the NFL championship a year later in 1957. After retiring from the NFL, Cassady became a special assistant in the New York Yankees organization in 1973 and was an assistant coach for the Clippers, who at the time was the Triple-A affiliate of New York, from 1992 to 2003. Santry, who spent time with Cassady as the media director for the Clippers organization, said the former Buckeye is a wonderful person. “He spent so many years with the organization, he is like a grandfather to us,” he said. “He’s a great guy.” Santry would not admit that Cassady’s ties to the Clippers gave him an edge over the other Columbus natives considered for the professional athlete bobblehead, but he said “it didn’t hurt.” Cassady is the first of three bobbleheads associated with OSU athletics. Bobbleheads of Olympian Jesse Owens and former Buckeyes football coach Woody Hayes will be available on July 29 and Aug. 12, respectively. For some fans, the bobbleheads associated with OSU ties are the most sought after. “Anytime I see a bobblehead of a former Buckeye being given out or available for purchase, I try to get it,” Larry Mitchell said. “I’ve got mostly football guys, so when I saw it was ‘Hop’ bobblehead day, I knew I had to come get one.” Mitchell, from Pataskala, said he plans on returning for the Owens and Hayes bobbleheads to add to his collection of about 40 Buckeyes-related bobbleheads that he said he started after the football team won the 2002 National Championship. “I have a lot of dust collectors,” he said with a grin. The Clippers bobblehead series honors more than just Columbus’ sports history. Non-sports related bobbleheads in the series include World War I veteran Eddie Rickenbacker, fast-food businessman Dave Thomas, the Columbus Zoo’s Jack Hanna and author James Thurber. “It’s a cool idea to celebrate not only the city’s sports history, but other aspects of our city’s rich history,” Muir said. read more

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