Syracuse’s improved blocks and service reception are behind lowered opponent hitting percentages

first_img Published on October 17, 2017 at 9:19 pm Contact David: [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse’s back row was on its game all night, receiving serves with poise and darting to any ball threatening to land in its territory. Clemson peppered the Orange defense with attacks on Oct. 6, and was repeatedly left frustrated by SU’s resilience.SU’s dominant run continued when 6-foot-4 Christina Oyawale leapt off the ground and emphatically blocked a Tiger attack attempt. She shouted, flexed and was mobbed by her teammates. The players’ screams, paired with the crowd’s roar, swallowed the Clemson players, who were left looking at each other, hoping to find a solution.SU went on to sweep the Tigers in straight sets, holding them to an .037 hitting percentage, the lowest mark of any opponent this season. Keeping its opponents’ hitting percentage low has been a theme of Syracuse’s (14-7, 6-2 Atlantic Coast) season, as the Orange has improved in all facets of defending. Last season, the Orange ranked 230th in the nation with an opponent hitting percentage of .217. This year, opponents have a .179 hitting percentage, 70th in the country. Serve reception, Santita Ebangwese said, is the key to having a stable defense.“You can tell that that the focus as a whole has changed from last year,” Belle Sand said.Sand, who leads SU with 4.14 digs per set, has been the constant in the back row of SU’s defense, which has used several different pieces this season. Players who identify as hitters, such as Ella Saada and Kendra Lukacs, have been forced to play more defensively due to injuries to teammates and themselves alike. Both Saada and Lukacs rank in the top five on the team in digs with 144 and 121, respectively.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“We want to be that scrappy team that can wear the opponent down,” Sand said of keep rallies alive via digs.Syracuse practices service reception by having coaches repeatedly serve balls over the net. Each ball is hit in a different direction to best simulate an in-game situation, whether it be across the court, down the line, deep or shallow. During the second part of the drill, a blocker is placed on the defender’s side of the net, and the back row must read around them. The Orange also runs this drill in warmups before each game.“Our serve reception has gotten much more aggressive,” head coach Leonid Yelin said.SU’s defense has also benefitted greatly from the improved play of its two main blockers: Ebangwese and Oyawale. The 6-foot Ebangwese leads the team with 1.41 blocks per set, up .28 since last season. Oyawale ranks third on the team with .8 blocks per set, up .24 since last season. Often times, the two assist each other on the block like against Wake Forest on Oct. 1. The two assisted each other on a block three times, including a first-set-ending stuff en route to a four-set victory.Similar to how SU practices service reception, coaches hit balls over the net for the blockers to repel. Sometimes, Ebangwese said, the ball will intentionally be hit out-of-bounds, and it is up to the blocker’s judgment to touch it or not.“We’re working on timing, when to jump, when to go up, and picking a spot to block,” Ebangwese said.The Orange’s improvement blocking and digging has helped turn a once vulnerable defense into a focal point of success. Commentslast_img read more

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Wellington Public Library to host “Where Immigration hits historical highway” Tuesday at 6:30 p.m.

first_imgWellington – The Wellington Public Library will host “Where Immigration Hits the Historical Highway,” a presentation and discussion by Antonio Delgado on October 21, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. in the Library Meeting Room at 121 West Seventh St. in Wellington.  Members of the community are invited to attend this free program. Contact the Wellington Public Library at (620) 326-2011 for more information. The program is made possible by the Kansas Humanities Council.Immigration is a dynamic experience that impacts the individual, family, community, and country. With a focus on Mexican immigration to the United States, this presentation will look at the experiences of 19th- and 20th-century immigrants and their personal and familial experiences, including the clash of cultures that sometimes occur and the changes in policy over the years.Antonio Delgado is a historian and expert on U.S. immigration policy. He has taught classes on immigration, Latin American studies, and urban policy at the University of Illinois in Chicago and served in the Chicago mayor’s office on community planning issues. Delgado gave a presentation last spring about Boxcar Communities around the Midwest.“The Mexican population in the U.S. is very diverse; some arrived in Kansas over 100 years ago to work in the railroads, some are decorated World War II veterans, and others are recently arrived undocumented laborers,” said Delgado. “Learning the history of your neighbors makes sense and leads to healthier relations.”“Where Immigration Hits the Historical Highway” is part of the Kansas Humanities Council’s Humanities Speakers Bureau, featuring presentations and discussions that examine our shared human experience—our innovations, culture, heritage, and conflicts.The Kansas Humanities Council conducts and supports community-based programs, serves as a financial resource through an active grant-making program, and encourages Kansans to engage in the civic and cultural life of their communities.  For more information about KHC programs contact the Kansas Humanities Council at (785) 357-0359 or visit online at www.kansashumanities.org.For more information about “Where Immigration Hits the Historical Highway” in Wellington contact the Wellington Public Library at (620) 326-2011 or visit www.wellingtonpubliclibrary.org.Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comment (1) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. 0 Vote up Vote down JustMe · 303 weeks ago “recently arrived undocumented laborers”…..lol Report Reply 0 replies · active 303 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

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